Hip Hop Luminaries Descend on Washington DC to Address Social Justice Issues

June 27, 2007 at 3:17 pm | Posted in Found At Other Sites | Leave a comment

Davey D: Hip-hop luminaries show commitment to social issues
By Davey D
Special to Mercury News

http://www.mercurynews.com/eyeheadlines/ci_6192492?nclick_check=1

Earlier this week, a standing-room-only crowd descended upon the bar/spoken word venue called Bar Nun on U street in Washington, D.C., to listen to a hip-hop panel discussion called, “There’s No Problem We Can’t Fix.”

The event was put together to complement the “Take Back America 2007” conference – put on by the progressive Democratic group Campaign for America’s Future – several blocks away. That conference has drawn thousands of people, including presidential candidates and local politicians, to talk about the future of this country.

A large number of hip-hop artists, journalists and activists made their way to Washington and Bar Nun to weigh in on the discussions. Some notables: San Jose’s Shamako Noble, who heads up Hip Hop Congress; the Source magazine editor/activist Biko Baker; and popular artists such as M-1 of dead prez, Umi of the RBG Family, Grammy-nominated rapper Mystic and Mississippi artist Kamikaze.

Hip-hop organizations ranging from the Universal Zulu Nation to Hip Hop Caucus to the League of Hip Hop Voters to the National Hip Hop Political Convention (NHHPC) were also in the building.

Many in attendance at both the “Take Back America” conference and the Bar Nun discussion realize hip-hop has matured and has a sizable power base and resources. Though a lot of the fallout from the Don Imus controversy focused on hip-hop, the movement is alive and well and is determined to be a factor in the 2008 presidential election. If you don’t believe me, then ask some of those presidential candidates whose aides were taking notes at Bar Nun.

During the panel discussion, former Bay Area resident Troy Nkrumah, who chairs NHHPC, said it was important that we in hip-hop be on the ground, engaging the community to make sure we are all on the same page. Many people, he said, irresponsibly speak on behalf of the hip-hop community and make foregone conclusions that are way off base. For example, last year he and his organization conducted a survey in Oakland to determine the biggest issue affecting the hip-hop community. He, along with others, assumed that issues like police brutality and street violence would be at the top of the list. They were surprised to learn the No. 1 issue cited by young adults was health care.

Nkrumah noted they also discovered many of the people surveyed were taking care of sick parents or grandparents, or siblings who had chronic illnesses such as asthma. The caretakers, he said, had insufficient or shabby health care and rarely had enough money to buy medicine.

Dr. Roger Mitchell, who heads the board of the D.C.-based Hip Hop Caucus, supported Nkrumah’s observations and added that many from inner-city communities are suffering from mental stress and other afflictions often overlooked or downplayed. Problems associated with poverty and inner-city living, he said, take a toll on physical and mental well-being.

Nkrumah also noted that none of the presidential candidates, despite their lofty rhetoric about universal health care, has really addressed specific concerns of this generation, nor have any of them outlined a game plan. Those issues will be front and center at the 2008 National Hip Hop Political Convention, which will be held in Las Vegas, and Nkrumah hopes to weigh in on them.

Others in attendance spoke out about the war in Iraq and related issues – including torture and slavery, which they argue takes place in places not only in Guanta`namo Bay and Darfur, but right here at home in our prisons.

Another highlight has been talking with nationally known mix-tape DJs like J Period and DJ Chela, who organized the Bar Nun discussion. During the last election, Period – who works with several activists organizations – played a key role in helping register close to a million people to vote.

DJ Chela spoke about organizing with fellow female DJs and artists to form a collective called New Girl Order. She said it was important that women have prime seats at the table, and that they create a space to develop themselves as leaders.

If that wasn’t enough, a sold out concert with lines stretching down the block at the 9:30 Club was the place where all the above mentioned artists including dead prez, Mystic and Wise Intelligent of Poor Righteous Teachers who headlined and a host of others from around the country and in the DC area came together to address the issue of Torture and demand the US shut down Guantanamo Bay and restore Habeas Corpus. It was a beautiful thing to see so many people come out in force along with Amnesty International the ACLU and and hear each artist hammer home the key talking points about this important issue.

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Davey D’s hip-hop column is published biweekly in Eye. Contact him at mrdaveyd@aol.com.

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atlantis: hymns for disco: k-os

June 27, 2007 at 11:19 am | Posted in Found At Other Sites, Reviews | Leave a comment

http://www.natcreole.com/music.k-os

.:: review

atlantis: hymns for disco
k-os
brook stephenson


When I first heard of k-os I wondered, “Who is that dude rhyming over that house beat?” Then I listened a bit more and said, “Yo, that kid rhyming over that house beat is killing it!” At the least, I can say I loved his debut album, Exit, which featured the single described above, “Superstar pt. Zero.” Now k-os has returned with his latest album, Atlantis-Hymns for Disco, but before we discuss his latest effort lets get you caught up to the album Joyful Rebellion, his sophomore release.

First off, he sings, produces and rhymes and is dope at each endeavor. His arrangements, samples, flows and cadences ride each riddum perfectly and distinctly on every album and song. Does he have a signature sound? If so, it would be good music. He promotes his philosophical positions like in Exit where he shows that hip-hop does not have to be in its current state, and then in Joyful Rebellion where he just drops all sorts of “I f*cking hate the current state of music for real but I love music” intimations (he never really said that but it felt like he was saying it) in a really soulful way. Based in Canada, k-os has tallied up numerous awards for his music and videos including, but not limited to, Best International Hip Hop Artist at the 2003 Source Awards, a Juno Award for Best Video of the Year and a Grammy nomination for Best Dance Song in 2003. That was Exit. Joyful Rebellion racked up three Juno Awards and he followed that up with a well-received DVD project. All that is said just to make sure you pay attention to him because now, we can talk about this album Atlantis-Hymns for Disco.

The album is great. It is better than the last two because with each album he reveals a different facet and grows as an artist.The music he makes is thick, light-hearted, heavy handed, torn, upbeat, down tempo, jazzy, show tune-ish, and catchy with healthy portions of singing, clapping and rapping. It is an exit, a joyful rebellion, with a floating-in-my-consciousness rock n roll sound that features sloppy drums, crisp snares, and gritty guitar riffs that are interpolated with cuts and scratches. It is art. Topic-wise this album sounds like the accompanying press release which is unusual. The press release is damn near a manifesto. In it k-os says, “to use your voice in the world is the greatest responsibility of an artist. Most revolutionary art ends up provoking classic ideals and it is these same classic ideals that become prisons if they go unchallenged.”

Songs like “Sunday Morning,” “The Rain,” and “ Valhalla” are stand-outs but the entire album grabs you and keeps you. Peep the “Sunday Morning” video link to his website www.k-osmusic.com. If you like that video/song and the other video/songs you might have just been put on to your new favorite artist of the year.

Not since Outkast has an artist or group grown and integrated music and life so seamlessly. Personally, I love this album and this artist’s perspective, integrity and commitment to being an artist at a time when many recording artists are not. I suspect you will too.

brook stephenson is the literary editor of Nat Creole but his knowledge expands beyond the written word. hit him up at bs@natcreole.com


click image for video

Breathe Again: Fabolous

June 25, 2007 at 1:14 pm | Posted in Found At Other Sites, Interviews | Leave a comment

http://www.hhnlive.com/features/more/302

Derek Phifer


www.myspace.com/fabolous

Now a seasoned veteran in the rap game, Fabolous is back on the scene with a new album and two singles that are blazing up the charts. Well respected in most circles for his flow and wordplay, Fab is looking to add on to his legacy with his new baby “From Nothin’ To Somethin’.” In this interview with HHNLive.com’s Derek Phifer, Fab sat down to talk about his new album, his opinions on the best rapper in the game, the King of New York, Stack Bundles, motivation and more. Now under the tutelage of Jay-Z, will Fab see his album sales sky rocket, or will he get Method Manned in the soap opera that is Def Jam?

Derek Phifer: What’s good Fab?

Fabolous: What’s up?

DP: Chillin’, chillin’ man.

DP: So what’s been going on with you man? Really haven’t heard much news about you up until this album.

FAB: Yea man. I had to really wait and get this situation cleared up with the switching labels and then after that I went in to record, so that was the whole time that I really took off know what I’m sayin’?

DP: Your album “From Nothing To Something” dropped in stores yesterday June 11 right?

FAB: Yea, yea.

DP: Based on those first day numbers, where do you expect your album to land on the charts next week?

FAB: Ummmmm…I think, I don’t know, I think I might be, I came out with a big dog, I heard that Toby Keith actually came out at the same time as me, so that’s a whole different lane of competition right there. That’s Country music. Over here in the states, Country music out sells pretty much every Hip-Hop album. I guess we’ll have to see how that turns out.

DP: What kind of mark do you normally set for your first week sales to classify it as a good week or a success?

FAB: I mean, I really usually have my average; my average is about 180 (thousand). So umm, I guess if I do that I guess I’ll be doing what I was doing on my last three albums.

DP: When you started out rappin’ in the game, did you think you’d be where you are right now this many years into it?

FAB: Umm, when I started out rappin’, I just really was doin’ it for a hobby, so I never even thought I would be an artist.

DP: Do you think that you still have anything to prove as an MC at this point?

FAB: Umm, I think that I can get better and better as an MC. I don’t really feel like I have anything to prove to anybody. I feel like I can improve, even better, I can be a bigger and bigger and bigger and better MC, but umm, I don’t feel like I need to prove, if there’s anything I got to prove, I got to prove it to myself really.

DP: A lot of cats have been jumpin’ ship over there at Def Jam and complaining about the way Jay-Z has been running things. Is there any validity to the claims that he’s used all of the money to advertise his album?

FAB: Man, I think Jay-Z has his own budget. I don’t think he uses any of anybody else’s money you know what I’m sayin’? I guess a lot of things happened. Jay-Z, he’s a different artist, you know what I mean, he’s a much bigger artist than a lot of good artists, so his promotion is at a different level. I don’t compare my situation with any other artist or with Jay-Z. I’m just workin’ it and what I have to do, outside of the label promotion, I have to do what I have to do too. I can’t just depend on the label, you know what I’m sayin’?

DP: Right, right. So you you’ve probably heard by now what happened to the homeboy Stack Bundles out here the other day right?

FAB: Yea.

DP: Yea, so when that type of stuff happens, does it kind of justify when dudes just leave the hood and don’t look back?

FAB: Umm, I mean, I wouldn’t say it’s justifiable for not looking back, but it’s justifiable for you…like everybody in the hood is not for your best interest. You can look at maybe Stack’s situation; he was a little too close for comfort, know what I mean? Certain things, that even I feel myself, that the hood is not capable of tolerating. Like Stacks, the way he had two cars and he was in the projects, and that kind of thing is hard for them to stomach or swallow or somethin’. It’s just like, you know, even when you come in and show them love in the same predicament that they in, it’s like maybe they still feel like you’re rubbin’ it in their face or somethin’. It’s like a hard thing; it’s like a catch 22. Like, you wanna show hood love and do everything, but then certain times you can get situations like what happened with Stack and it just make you wonder if it’s even worth it you know what I’m sayin’?

DP: Yea. So excluding yourself, who’s the best rapper in the game right now and why?

FAB: Umm, excluding myself? I would have to say I still feel like Jay-Z is a hell of a rapper. Like he’s one of the dudes, like the way he puts his songs together, metaphors, word play, flow like he’s still one of the top. You haven’t heard too many people say they haven’t heard the Jay-Z that you may have known in the past see what I’m sayin’, but he’s still like top dog, he’s still does his thing.

DP: Who’s the best producer right now?

FAB: The best producer, uhh, in my ear, I would have to say it’s gotta be between, I haven’t heard a producer in a while that could make a whole song, I would have to say between Timbaland and Akon. Timbaland and Akon are two great producers right now. I don’t think that Akon gets a lot of production credit cause people don’t know that he be doin’ to these joints, but he is definitely a problem on the beats.

DP: Yea, I ain’t even know he did beats.

DP: So what do you think it’s going to take for these New York rappers to stop going at each other’s necks and just put the state back where it’s supposed to be in the rap game?

FAB: Umm, I think they need to just make good music man. They all fightin’ over something that’s so subtle and the “King of New York” when that’s not even, that title doesn’t really even mean anything at the present time you know what I’m sayin’? They need to really focus on the bigger page you know what I mean, the bigger picture.

DP: How is “From Nothin’ To Somethin’” going to be different from the rest of your albums that we’ve heard so far?

FAB: I mean definitely good music and as far as that goes, every album, that’s a lot. My push is to make great music, but perhaps that shows a little goal. It shows different scenarios, it caters to different ears, and it’s versatile in the music you know what I’m sayin’? Like I said, with the growth, it doesn’t just go over people’s heads, it grows the fan with it, so that’s another thing it does.

DP: This far into the game, is it hard for you not to fall into the trap of rapping about your money on every track due to a lack of relevant material?

FAB: Umm, I mean certain things, even when I talk about money in a sense it’s metaphoric, it’s in different situations, you know what I’m sayin’, money is a topic that everybody relates to, whether they gettin’ money or tryin’ to make money, whether they don’t have money, it’s a similar situation to everybody, so there’s a lot of ways to talk about money you know what I’m sayin’. I never really have a problem talkin’ about money or situations of money. The title of my album is “From Nothin’ To Somethin’” you know what I’m sayin’, about what people know as the motivation of the music is to motivate people who have whatever they have to want more, not to call anybody’s anything nothing. If you have something, you should want more also, you know what I’m sayin’? I feel like a lot of people have that mindset, not in just becoming a billionaire or anything, but if you’re a journalist, you may want your own magazine one day and there’s nobody that says you can’t have it or shouldn’t have it, so sometimes motivation can be music too. Music can keep your day goin’ smooth and help your day go through easier and keep you focused on what you tryin’ to become, you know what I’m sayin, and that’s what I was tryin’ to do with the music on this album and uhh talkin’ money sometimes motivates too. People get motivated when they talk about money so, it’s definitely something that I wanted to do.

DP: I saw you on 106 & Park yesterday and this is kind of a left field question that I wanted to ask you, who do you think looks better, Roxy or Free, the old host?

FAB: Uhh, I think I would go for Free. Free is a little more curvy. Roxy is a little bit young. I just like Free’s personality, not to disclaim Roxy as a person, because Roxy is actually my friend just the same. On that kind of level, I’m probably lookin’ for Free.

DP: Is there anything else that you want to say before we wrap up the interview?

FAB: Oh nah just appreciate everybody that’s been supportin’ me on all levels, not just with this album, but for the last albums also and if they wanna holla at me they can hit me up on the myspace page http://myspace.com/fabulous Check it out and that’s pretty much it. Get that album, it’s in the stores, “From Nothin’ To Somethin’”

Hip Hop Has Long Been Vocal About the War by Davey D

June 14, 2007 at 9:57 pm | Posted in Editorials/Opinions, Found At Other Sites | 2 Comments

Hip-hop has been vocal about the war
By Davey D
Special to the Mercury News

While debates raged in Congress recently about funding the war in Iraq, the Source Magazine, which has long been considered the bible of hip-hop, published an article asking why more rap artists haven’t spoken out against the war. It also profiled Oakland rapper Boots Riley of the Coup and Mississippi rapper David Banner, because both have been vocal from Day One about their opposition to U.S. intervention in Iraq and assertions that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction.

Ironically, the Source article hit the newsstands at the same time as a Chicago Tribune column by Grammy-nominated rap superstar Twista, who took the president to task for his veto of an early bill that attached war funding to a timetable for withdrawal from Iraq. Twista urged fans to speak up and do whatever they could to bring the troops home.

“They didn’t attack us, so why should we have to attack them?” he wrote. “Sometimes I don’t know what to think.”

I’m certain Twista was offended by the Source article, just as I was, because his position on the war was similar to that of countless hip-hop artists who have expressed vehement opposition and have taken action.

In the Bay Area, three anti-war hip-hop compilation albums have been released: Hard Knock Records’ critically acclaimed “What About Us,” which featured Zion I, Blackalicious, Michael Franti, the Frontline, Piper of Flipsyde, Rico Pabon and Hobo Junction, among others; “War (if it feels good do it!),” a compilation by Bay Area music veteran Billy Jam, which features sound montages skillfully mixed by the DJs of Mass Destruction and songs from Public Enemy, Mr. Lif and local artists Azeem and Aya de Leon; and “War Times – Reports From the Opposition,” put out by Oakland’s Freedom Fighter Music, hosted by political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal and featuring anti-war songs by local artists Goapele, Hanifah Walidah, Felonious and Red Guard and tracks by nationally known spoken-word artists Danny Hoch and Suheir Hammad. Many of the artists on “War Times” also organized and participated in anti-war rallies around the country.

We would be remiss not to mention Bay Area rapper Paris‘ album “Sonic Jihad,” which was probably the first disc addressing the events of Sept. 11, 2001, and the war in Iraq. Featured on this landmark LP were dead prez, Kam and Public Enemy. The album was accompanied by a 10-page essay and, later, a DVD breaking down the politics behind Sept. 11 and the war on terror. It sold more than 300,000 copies worldwide.

Also deserving a mention is San Francisco’s Rappin’ 4-Tay, who teamed with then-presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich to do the song “Weapons of Mass Distraction.”

These examples represent just the tip of the iceberg. To date, more than 100 anti-war songs have been put out by hip-hop artists.

They range from Snoop Dogg‘s insightful “Brothers and Sisters” to Nas‘ Tears for Fears-inspired “Rule,” Eminem‘s groundbreaking “Mosh,” Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Mele-Mel‘s “Tha Bushes,”, Sage Francis‘s “Makeshift Patriot” and KRS‘s heartfelt track “Soldier.” Even the Ying Yang Twins released an anti-war song, “We at War.” These are just a few of many that stand out.

Former San Jose producer Fredwreck brought together some of the biggest acts on the West Coast, including Mack 10, WC, Dilated Peoples, Defari, Cypress Hill and Daz, to do two anti-war songs, “Down With Us” and “Dear Mr. President.” Radio stations were afraid to touch these politically charged songs, even though they were available for free.

Lupe Fiasco, Jay-Z, Cypress Hill, Mobb Deep, Saul Williams, Wyclef Jean and Talib Kweli are also among those who have recorded, or were featured on, anti-war songs. We had all sorts of Hip Hop journalists and scholars ranging from author Kevin Powell to Professor Michael Eric Dyson to activist /author Adrienne Marie Brown formerly of the League of Pissed off Voters who have been vocal in their writings about the wrongness of the War. People should not forget that KRS-One held a well attended anti-war/9-11 conference in LA to mark the one year anniversary of 9-11. The event included artists like MC Lyte and Kool Moe Dee to name a few. This is just a short list of Hip Hoppers who have

Lastly we have several under-reported stories where Hip Hop stood up against the War. The first involved P-Diddy who several months before he launched his Citizen for Change/Vote or Die campaign in February of 2004, astonished a large crowd in Los Angeles attending the Rock the Vote/Lippert Awards. Diddy upon receiving an award gave a 7 minute speech in which he pledged to ‘Kick George Bush’s ass out of office’. He apologized to the event organizers who were supposed to be non-partisan and then he repeated his remarks. He went on to note that Bush needed to go because of the immeasurable pain he had caused countless inner city mothers who’s sons and daughters had died in an ‘illegal war’. Hearing Diddy go off on the political tip was dope and at the time a welcome breath of fresh air. In spite of the throngs of media present including MTV and the LA Times, Diddy’s explosive anti-war remarks were hardly reported. It took me several weeks before I finally was able to obtain a copy of his remarks and at the time I sat on the advisory board for RTV.

Hip Hop mogul Russell Simmons was much more blunt and explosive with his remarks directed toward Senator Hillary Clinton shortly after the start of the Iraq War. He along with Big Daddy Kane and Killer Priest appeared on our syndicated Hard Knock Radio show where all three spoke out forcefully against the war. Simmons put Clinton on full blast, accusing her of selling out and being untrustworthy. He remarked how he given all sorts of money to help get her elected and was angry that she would support the war which he felt was wrong. Simmons was also clear about expressing his concern for the number of poor people who were likely to wind up on the front lines dying.

Just recently, we had Washington DC based Hip Hop Caucus do a two month Make Hip Hop not War tour in over ten cities and colleges campuses throughout the US. Reverend Yearwood who headed up the tour wanted to make sure that Hip Hop had a stronger presence in the anti-war movement. Artists ranging from Akir to Immortal Technique to Hasan Salaam to Mystic to DJ Chela who did an anti-war mixtape called ‘Embedded Reporter’ all partook.

As I mentioned earlier, all this is just the tip of the Iceberg, so let it never be said hip-hop has been silent about the war. We need to ask why we haven’t heard more of these voices in the mainstream. If there’s anyone that’s been silent and complicit, it’s been those big time broadcast, newspaper and television owners and programmers who went along with Bush’s war agenda in the face of overwhelming evidence suggesting we go in another direction.

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Davey D’s hip-hop column appears biweekly in Eye. Contact him at mrdaveyd@aol.com.

The HHNLive.com Interview: T.I. Part 2

June 14, 2007 at 9:52 pm | Posted in Found At Other Sites, Interviews | Leave a comment

http://www.hhnlive.com/features/more/298

Aaron Frank

In the final part of his T.I. feature, HHNLive.com writer Aaron Frank has T.I. open up about his recording process, growing as an artist, working with Jay-Z, the concept for “T.I. Vs. T.I.P.” and much more.

“I don’t think there’s anybody that can do what I do” – T.I.

AF: TIP seems to be the darker side of the two personalities that you’ve talked about, so would you say that you’ve managed to keep him in control over recent years?

TI: Nah, man. Who gonna keep me under control? Nah, he live on TV and I live on TV. Whenever we’re on TV, it’s both of us there point blank period. It’s just how I walk the streets.

AF: Well, with certain situations that you’ve had to deal with on the business side, wouldn’t you say you probably would have acted a little different a few years ago?

TI: Absolutely. It wouldn’t have been so much of this nice guy shit. It wouldn’t have been as much of this blazer shit with silk shirts on and the three piece suit, you know. The silk hanky and all that kind of shit. People that know me from before definitely wouldn’t have expected me to do many of the things that I’ve done over the last few years.

AF: You’ve worked with a lot of different classic southern artists like UGK already, but who did you look to for inspiration when you were making these last two albums?

TI: UGK definitely. Outkast definitely. Goodie Mob, Scarface, Cash Money as well. 8Ball & MJG.

AF: How long had you been planning on doing the T.I. vs. T.I.P album?

TI: I mean…it was a possible concept, but it didn’t happen until all of the things started falling into place. The two personalities fell into place and the conflict just grew between them. Like, the same thing that prompted the song “T.I. Vs. T.I.P.” prompted the album. There were real life situations and scenarios that brought on that song. And from the time that song was released up until now, there have been many other situations and scenarios that have occurred, so many that it prompted an album, not just a song.

AF: What was it like to work with Jay-Z on this album?

TI: It was a dream come true, you know. Anybody that ever came into this game as a rapper and intended on being the best and had high expectations, they always have people that they have wanted to work with, probably a list of people. Every time you get a chance to work with these people, it’s just a feeling of huge accomplishment.

AF: You and Jay-Z have that street credibility that is clearly reflected in a lot of your lyrics. Do you feel like it’s necessary for rappers nowadays to have that in order to be successful?

TI: Absolutely. If you’re going to be a rapper that makes money, then people are going to have to respect you. If you aint got respect in this world, you aint got nothing. People like you, cool, but do they respect you? They’re only going to like you for the time that you do what they want you to do. The minute you go against whatever they want you to do, then they’re not going to like you. They have to go off of the respect that they have for you.

AF: Part of the reason that your music has been so successful is because of the content of your music and how real-life situations are reflected. Do you feel like writing about those situations is almost like therapeutic to you or do those things just come out when you’re writing?

TI: I mean, I just tell the truth period. Whether or not it’s therapeutic or not, I can’t say, but however I feel, then I kick it. That’s what I say. If I feel like I don’t like being in the game, then I kick it. If I feel like the game ain’t shit without me and I gotta stay to save it, then I kick it. If I feel like going out and having a good time, then I kick it like that, you know. It’s whatever.

AF: A lot of people have commented on how your flow has supposedly changed over the years. Do you think your style has changed or do you think you’re just more confident in switching it up on different beats?

TI: Sure, I don’t think I ever had a certain style before. I’ve always had an ability to go in and out of different patterns, subject matter, different types of beats. I’ve always had different approaches to making songs. You never could just put me in a style box. I’ve got several styles and they’ve just developed more and more and they’ve just become more diverse as my albums progressed.

AF: So you think that just stands out more now?

TI: Yeah, I show off with it more now. I’ll come out with a song like “What You Know” and then come out with something like “Why You Wanna.” Then, I’ll do a song like “Live In the Sky” and when they think I’m going right with it, I’ll drop a “Top Back,” you know. You know, I do what I want to do with this music.

AF: I know you supposedly squashed that beef with Luda, but what did you think about what he said in his interview in Playboy?

TI: I mean, as long as he didn’t say nothing negative about me. It’s whatever.

AF: Do you think there are any other rappers on your level right now?

TI: I don’t think that there are many rappers out there that can do what I do period. I don’t think there’s anybody that can do what I do. There’s some people out there that can do part of what I do and do a few of the things that I can do, but can’t nobody do what I do.

AF: What kind of influence are you about to have on this BG project that’s coming out later this year?

TI: His album is entitled “Too Hood For Hollywood” and he gonna be on the way. We gonna try to get it at the end of this year or the first of next year.

AF: What about Big Kuntry King and Young Dro?

TI: Big Kuntry could be at the end of this year or the first of next year. Young Dro will be first of next year definitely.

AF: So, at the end of the day, is there any one thing that you want people to get out of your music?

TI: Man, just the type of person that I am and the moral standards that I possess, just the things that I stand for.

Back In The Day

June 13, 2007 at 8:55 pm | Posted in Found At Other Sites | Leave a comment

http://www.yolandajackson.bravehost.com/Poems1310.html

In honor of “True Dat Thursdays” (my own creative day) and the idea of my sister & best buddy Sha’Ri 🙂 – I submit to you one of my poems “Back In The Day – (c) 2007” for your reading pleasure.

MESSAGE IN POEM:  This poem is for all of us mid 60’s & 70’s babies –  just a rhyme to remind us how much fun we had back in the day.

Feel free to spread the word – Until next time…

Much Love, Yo

Back In The Day

Do you remember when we were young

Outside playing

Having a ball

No cell phones and no pagers

Mom said be in front of the house

Before the street lights were on

You made sure you were

Otherwise she would wear out your buns

Mom and dad raised you

But the neighbors did too

There was no talking back

Trying to show off in front of your Crew

Curfew was implemented

Education taking seriously

Teachers made phone calls to your home

It scared you immensely

You had to ask if you could go out

And you made sure you stayed where you were told

There were no sudden movements

You just were not that bold

Televisions were black and white

Some of us had color

There were no remote controls

You used your little sisters or brothers

The words “thank you” were words you spoke

There was a level of respect

If you didn’t give it

Moms and dad were capable of “ringing your neck”

When the fight jumped off

The crowd gathered around

No gunshots ringing out

Just folks rolling around on the ground

The school parties were a big event

Got your party clothes out the week before

Talked about it Monday – Friday

And when Friday came you got geeked up even more

No Computers

Or reality TV

But there were after school specials

That you couldn’t wait to see

Best time to get what you wanted

Was when mom was on the phone

She told you yes

So you would just leave her alone

But if you tried to be slick

It definitely caught up

Because after she was off the phone and realized

You got put on punishment or had a very sore butt

When you had birthday parties

It was a neighborhood invite

And one of the best gifts you got

Was that banana seat bike

We used ice-cream sticks

To put in our bicycle wheels

Made it sound like a motorcycle

Those were our thrills

Skates use to have metal wheels

You strapped up to your shoes

There was not much fancy footwork

More like very simple moves

When it was hot

You made kool aid and put it in the freezer

With the plastic Popsicle maker

Mixing cherry, strawberry, grape – all the flavors

Candy was really a penny

Phone calls were really a dime

Cigarettes were really 80 cents

And the words “no cobbs” was used all the time

Phil Collins “Air Tonight”

Colonel Abrams “I’m Trapped”

Michael Jackson “PYT”

Were some of the songs we talked about

Yeah I remember those times

Wasn’t that long ago

Now things are a totally different way

But it was good times, back in the day

Written By – Yolanda Jackson

Copyright © 2007 – Poetic Reality, All Rights Reserved

The HHNLive.com Interview: T.I. Part 1

June 12, 2007 at 11:09 pm | Posted in Found At Other Sites, Interviews | Leave a comment

http://www.hhnlive.com/features/more/296

 Aaron Frank

As a young teen in Atlanta, T.I. already knew that music was going to be the thing that would take him from Bankhead to Hollywood. Few anticipated that he would also become one of the hottest and biggest selling young artists to ever come out of the South. T.I. became an icon for success in rap music last year when he won the Grammy for Best Rap Solo Performance with “What You Know” and was also nominated for best rap song and best rap album.

All of the success hasn’t gone to the head of T.I. who is making it apparent that he’s not afraid of switching his style up, especially with his latest album, TI vs. TIP, which is said to exhibit the every day tension between his two personas. HHNLive.com writer Aaron Frank sits down for an in-depth chat with the self proclaimed “King of the south” T.I. In part 1 of this 2-part feature, T.I. discusses the deep ties of his PSC crew, the launch of Grand Hustle, his film aspirations, giving back to the community and much more.

AF: When did you originally shorten your name to T.I. and what was the reason behind that?

T.I.: We changed the name right before I’m Serious came out and that was because Q-Tip was on Arista at the time and two TIP’s on one label would have been kind of confusing.

AF: What all was going on with your career at that time and do you feel like you became more dedicated around then?

T.I.: Sure I did. I think I developed a whole ‘nother level of playing field for myself as an artist.

AF: How did the whole situation with PSC first start out?

TI: PSC is something that isn’t just in music, man. That’s for life, you know. Those have been my homeboys since 14, 15, 16 years old, so that comes far before the music. I had been doing demos since I was 11 or 12, but I didn’t meet them until I was 14 or 15, but at the same time I met them, I stopped doing music. I was doing it here and there, but I wasn’t pursuing it like I was when I found an outlet to do other things. When we connected, we bonded as a family first and then after that we went back and made “I Miss My Homeboys.” After that was when we really started rapping again and then we stopped again after my partner Cap went to jail. My cousin introduced me to Toomp who introduced me to Jason Geter and that’s when I started back making music around the time I was about 17 or 18.

AF: When did you decide that you wanted to get the whole Grand Hustle movement started?

TI: That was just us acting as an independent record company due to lack of support from major labels and the label (Arista) from my first album. We just figured that if we were going to act as an independent label, then we should get the credit for being independent. So, part of being an independent label is just developing a name and building a brand. Jason’s management company was called Grand Hustle and I liked that name, so I was just like let’s go with that.

AF: If you could’ve done it again, would you have just started Grand Hustle before you signed to Arista?

TI: Well, that’s just the approach that I saw fit to go with at the time, but I was fortunate enough to be able to reapply my knowledge to the market after I got myself off of Arista. I learned everything that I had to learn from being on a major, so I was able to apply some of those things to the underground and still utilize the same relationships and resources. But I was able to do it for myself instead of doing it for a conglomerate that’s going to get all of the credit for it. At that point, I understood what it meant to be on a major label and to own your own company and get profit shares and have a joint venture. I knew that was where the money and the value was for real and you could actually get equity from the work that you put out.

AF: You started pretty early with the mixtapes compared to other artists in the South, so what did you originally think about the whole idea of the In Da Streetz series with Drama?

TI: I saw how well it worked for 50 and I figured that was just a way to get your numbers up, you know. You create a demand and the best way to create a demand is to serve the people ourselves with new product, not waiting on a deal and for a label to put something out. You gotta put that shit out there and let it affect the market as necessary. I was fortunate enough to get it in.

AF: As far as the content in your music, has anything changed and what can we expect on T.I. vs. T.I.P?

TI: It’s goin hard. It’s definitely one of the best albums ever made and I think it’s going to be the album of the millennium. I don’t think there’s been a hotter album than this in about 10 years. You know, you’re gonna have to go to Life After Death, Ready To Die, All Eyez On Me, Reasonable Doubt. You’re gonna have to back to Straight Outta Compton, Southernplayalistic, Aquemini. You’re gonna have to go back a while.

AF: Yeah, from what I’ve heard, it sounds like it’s going to be up there. I’ve heard the two singles and the iTunes sampler.

TI: Yeah, “My Swag” and “We Do This” are definitely 3rd single contenders, but there’s still a hell of a lot of shit that they didn’t play.

AF: Why wasn’t Toomp featured on any of the production on this album?

TI: Me and Toomp didn’t find enough time to be able to work with one another. I don’t know, I think every time his manager spoke to my manager, all the other stuff kept getting in the way and we didn’t get the chance to vibe like we needed to.

AF: Do you think it’s going to be an album that’s ahead of it’s time or is it going to just hit you hard from the beginning?

TI: Nah, it’s gonna hit you the first time you hear it. It’s a wild ride, man. If you just sit yourself down and listen to this album from top to bottom, it’s a wild ride. I’m happy it’s coming out on July 3rd, so when everybody get it, it’ll be 4th of July. So, it’s going to be the soundtrack to every cookout and barbecue and if they don’t have it, you need to pack your shit and hit the door, because there got to be a hotter barbecue.

AF: Out of all the different albums and mixtapes you’ve put out, which songs do you feel like are most representative of the T.I. side of your personality?

TI: Pussy Popper Number One, Let’s Get Away, I Can’t Be Your Man, Why You Wanna, Live In The Sky, Get Loose, Stand Up Guy, My Love, I’m A Flirt, Be Better Than Me, Why You Mad At Me, Just Doin My Job, Do It Baby, Meet Me At the Hotel. Those are all I can remember off of the top of my head.

AF: What type of business ventures will be able to expect from T.I. in the future? What can we expect from the movies that you’re putting out soon?

TI: Grand Hustle Films. We producing a film called For Sale. We finished the script and we’re just going after directors right now. We’re gonna be casting after that and it’s just set in the world of car dealerships in Atlanta. There’s a lot of those in Atlanta because it’s a place where you gotta have a car. Our transit system isn’t elaborate like New York. It ain’t to the point where you can ride the bus and still get to all of the places that you need to get to in a days time. So, therefore everybody can’t afford it or has the credit to just go and get a new Benz or even a Ford for that matter. So, for that very reason, you have tons of “Buy Here, Pay Here” types of places. It’s a whole hustle in itself and with that whole world, we’ve just found it easy to find humor in it. We’ve also got a film called Once Was Lost that I’m producing and starring in with Danny Glover. We’re going to start production on that in late October.

AF: You don’t hear a lot about the good things that rappers are doing, especially within the media. Everybody knows you’re involved with a lot of charitable organizations in Atlanta, so do you all have anything in particular going on right now?

TI: Yeah, we’ve got the KING Foundation going on in Atlanta. That’s Kids In Need of Giving and I work hands-on with a lot of different young black males, mostly pre-teens and teenagers. I work with them very closely and I’m working with Boys and Girls Club, Single Parent Initiative, It’s Cool To Be Smart, Make-A-Wish. I work alongside these organizations and we’re trying to get as much as possible done to spread that positive message and display a positive image to the youth.

AF: What is T.I.’s favorite thing to do outside of the music business?

TI: Just spending time with my family, traveling, and golf. I like to go to the clubs and throw money up and all that too though.

Three 6 Mafia: Chasing the treasure

June 11, 2007 at 7:46 pm | Posted in Found At Other Sites | 1 Comment

http://www.prefixmag.com/features/T/three-6-mafia/566566Three-6-Mafia.jpg

By : Rafael Martinez

Three 6 Mafia’s Oscar win was one of the most bizarre moments in hip-hop history. It will go down in the annals of history with Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s bum rush of the Grammy stage during Shawn Colvin’s song-of-the-year acceptance speech to tell the audience that “Wu-Tang is for the children” and with Karl Rove’s “rapping” and jigging at the White House correspondence dinner. Most would have expected hip-hop’s first Oscar for best original song to have gone to a generic hard-knock-life-esque track by Jay-Z or a “conscious” song with a sped-up soul sample from Kanye West. Instead, the formerly regionally confined Three 6 Mafia inexplicably took the gold in 2006 for “It’s Hard Out There for a Pimp,” from the movie Hustle & Flow. No one seemed more shocked than Three 6 Mafia themselves.

Three 6 Mafia may have become a household name that night, but a generation of southerners have grown up with the Memphis, Tennessee group’s menacing production and chant-inducing after-hours anthems. To capitalize on their newfound mainstream success, Three 6 Mafia, the subject of a new reality show on MTV, have relocated to Hollywood in the hopes of cashing in after all of those years toiling away in relative anonymity. Although their Oscar win may only result in a future Trivial Pursuit question, nobody can take away the impact Three 6 Mafia has had on the South’s recent domination of hip-hop. Juicy J and DJ Paul (the two mainstays in the group, which has been around since the early ’90s) give some advice on how to stop a two-way freak from blowing up your phone, talk about their new album, Last 2 Walk (due May 22 on Columbia), and discuss the one post-Oscars offer they refused to get down with.

Memphis has a long history with music, but not with hip-hop. When did you guys first hear hip-hop music? Were there any local artists at the time doing it Memphis?

Juicy J: Nah. Back in the day we used to listen primarily to East Coast records. Back then, that was what was hot. There wasn’t anybody really doing it out in Memphis.

DJ Paul: We also used to listen to a lot of West Coast shit — NWA and also the Ghetto Boys when they dropped.

Juicy J: Beyond some deejays out in Memphis, nobody was really doing it until much later.

As Southern artists doing it since the early ’90s, what do you think changed in hip-hop that moved the music from East Coast to the South?

Juicy J: I just think it is good music. I don’t really think anything has changed. This person gets to do it now and this person gets to do it later. Everybody gets their time to shine. When a New York rapper comes out he does his thing, and when a Southern rapper comes out he does his thing. Everybody gets their time to shine. That’s the way I see it.

It seems to me the new generation of Southern artists look up to you guys, UGK, and Outkast and looks to get you on their albums as a stamp of approval. Why is this? In the East Coast, nobody really looks to get with legends like Big Daddy Kane or Kool G Rap.

Juicy J: Down in the South, pretty much everybody is in one circle. This person lives down the street, this person lives right over there. Especially when you’re hometown is like Atlanta or Houston, a lot of rappers just stick together.

DJ Paul: The one thing about Three 6 Mafia and UGK is they been around so long and still doing good. UGK can come in like five years later with no video or promotion and still turn around and sell platinum. With some of the artist that you mentioned, like Big Daddy Kane, people don’t see them around any more, and some of the older East Coast artists aren’t making records. I think that’s why artists don’t go to them. But you see UGK all the time.

Now that you guys are nationally known, are you ready to take the brunt of criticism from the likes of Bill Cosby and Oprah?

DJ Paul: Man, we don’t pay attention to no negativity. As long as they cut the check, they can talk all they want. As long I keep getting paid, eat good and drink good, I am good.

You guys have worked with Project Pat for a long time and are currently working on a new album. He is another unrated artist that has never got his due. How do you plan on changing that?

Juicy J: How do we get Pat in the limelight? We constantly trying to promote him, put him on a lot of songs. He wrote a lot of songs on the new album. So he’s going to be around; he ain’t going nowhere. We’re coming out with my new album this year, and his new album is coming out. And we’re going to get him at the status that we are at right now. We just gotta keep working at it. It’s a hustle.

Three 6 Mafia’s membership has changed a bunch of times over the years, yet the core members have always stayed together. Why was it able to work between you guys and not the other former members of the group?

DJ Paul: We see eye to eye on everything. We got a lot of the same tastes. We like the same food, same women — sometimes we go with the same women! We pretty much like everything the same.

The club scene in the South is an important place to break records and keep up with your fan base. You had a hit back in the day called “Tear Da Club Up.” I couldn’t imagine what happens when you used to play a song like that in those small Southern clubs.

DJ Paul: “Tear Da Club Up” is what the South loves. That was always a big thing in Memphis. To tear the club up, man. We started out as deejays — before we was rappers we was deejays — so it was our job to cut the club up. But when we became rappers, it was the same mission.

You can tell; you guys have that deejay’s ear for catchy music.

Juicy J: Yeah, man. It’s them very catchy hooks that will get you a hit.

DJ Paul: That’s what Three 6 Mafia is all about: catchy hooks and hardcore beats. We like that shit as hard as we can get it — it’s in between rap and rock. Just crazy crank it up! Move you out yo’ seat.

Your track “Two-Way Freak” for me was ahead of its time. Now everybody uses text messages. How do you stop these freaks from abusing the phone?

Juicy J: Man, to get rid of a two-way freak, change yo’ number!

DJ Paul: Don’t ever text her back; just stop showing her attention, don’t text her “stop callin’ me, bitch” or “leave me da fuck alone!” Don’t do none of that. Jus stop responding, period. It might take a month, but she will eventually stop callin’ you.

Obviously things have changed drastically, but you have been doing your thing independently for a long time. How do you plan to keep your name bubbling in the mainstream?

DJ Paul: We have always handled our business on our own. Right now the business is just mo’ business that got to be handled. That ain’t no problem for us; we got a team and staff. We been doing this for years now, so it ain’t no problem.

You guys must have been offered a lot of different projects. Was there anything in particular that you refused to work on?

Juicy J: The only thing we turned down was some porn.

DJ Paul: That’s the only thing we have turned down so far. Would you do porn?

I can’t see myself doing porn, so probably not. I guess for the most part the offers have been up your alley?

Juicy J: Yeah, if they talking about the right money. We have turned down a bunch of shit where they weren’t talking the right money.

DJ Paul: Other than the porn shit, we turned plenty of shit that didn’t have the money right.

Juicy J: You got to have your money right!

You have the new show on MTV. During your time out in L.A. and away from Memphis, what did you miss the most?

DJ Paul: Food and family.

Juicy J, I remember you did a special with MTV where you drove around in your Bentley in the projects in Memphis. It seems like you guys have strong connection with home. Did you have any reservations about going out to Los Angeles?

Juicy J: Well, we still live in Memphis. We just came to L.A. to capitalize off the Oscar.

DJ Paul: Memphis will always be home, but we chasing money. If somebody told me there was treasure hidden in Yugoslavia, I am headed that way to get it. We tryin’ to go get the treasure man. Where it’s at? I don’t care how long I will have to be there, but I will return to Memphis with that treasure.

The new album, Last 2 Walk, is due on July 3. Do hardcore fans need to worry about Three 6 Mafia compromising their sound? And what can we expect from the album?

DJ Paul: Overall it is DJ Paul and Juicy J. We got Project Pat doing some writing and guest featuring on there. We got Game on the album, Lil Jon, Lil Keke, Paul Wall, Mike Jones, 8 Ball and MJG, the ladies of Crime Mob, some local heroes, Al Capone, Spanish Fly, Lil Whyte, and a feature from Akon.

Juicy J: The album is hot — our best album yet.

DJ Paul: People think that we moved to L.A. and the sound is going to be different, but the sound is the same. We are never going to disappoint our fans. The original Three 6 Mafia fans come first.

***

Band: http://www.triplesix.com/

Label: http://www.columbiarecords.com/

Audio: http://www.myspace.com/threesixmafia

Three 6 Mafia: Chasing the Treasure

June 8, 2007 at 11:30 am | Posted in Found At Other Sites | Leave a comment

http://www.prefixmag.com/features/T/three-6-mafia/566

566Three-6-Mafia.jpg

By : Rafael Martinez

June 1, 2007

Three 6 Mafia’s Oscar win was one of the most bizarre moments in hip-hop history. It will go down in the annals of history with Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s bum rush of the Grammy stage during Shawn Colvin’s song-of-the-year acceptance speech to tell the audience that “Wu-Tang is for the children” and with Karl Rove’s “rapping” and jigging at the White House correspondence dinner. Most would have expected hip-hop’s first Oscar for best original song to have gone to a generic hard-knock-life-esque track by Jay-Z or a “conscious” song with a sped-up soul sample from Kanye West. Instead, the formerly regionally confined Three 6 Mafia inexplicably took the gold in 2006 for “It’s Hard Out There for a Pimp,” from the movie Hustle & Flow. No one seemed more shocked than Three 6 Mafia themselves.

 

Three 6 Mafia may have become a household name that night, but a generation of southerners have grown up with the Memphis, Tennessee group’s menacing production and chant-inducing after-hours anthems. To capitalize on their newfound mainstream success, Three 6 Mafia, the subject of a new reality show on MTV, have relocated to Hollywood in the hopes of cashing in after all of those years toiling away in relative anonymity. Although their Oscar win may only result in a future Trivial Pursuit question, nobody can take away the impact Three 6 Mafia has had on the South’s recent domination of hip-hop. Juicy J and DJ Paul (the two mainstays in the group, which has been around since the early ’90s) give some advice on how to stop a two-way freak from blowing up your phone, talk about their new album, Last 2 Walk (due May 22 on Columbia), and discuss the one post-Oscars offer they refused to get down with.

Memphis has a long history with music, but not with hip-hop. When did you guys first hear hip-hop music? Were there any local artists at the time doing it Memphis?

Juicy J: Nah. Back in the day we used to listen primarily to East Coast records. Back then, that was what was hot. There wasn’t anybody really doing it out in Memphis.

 

DJ Paul: We also used to listen to a lot of West Coast shit — NWA and also the Ghetto Boys when they dropped.

 

Juicy J: Beyond some deejays out in Memphis, nobody was really doing it until much later.

 

As Southern artists doing it since the early ’90s, what do you think changed in hip-hop that moved the music from East Coast to the South?

Juicy J: I just think it is good music. I don’t really think anything has changed. This person gets to do it now and this person gets to do it later. Everybody gets their time to shine. When a New York rapper comes out he does his thing, and when a Southern rapper comes out he does his thing. Everybody gets their time to shine. That’s the way I see it.

 

It seems to me the new generation of Southern artists look up to you guys, UGK, and Outkast and looks to get you on their albums as a stamp of approval. Why is this? In the East Coast, nobody really looks to get with legends like Big Daddy Kane or Kool G Rap.

Juicy J: Down in the South, pretty much everybody is in one circle. This person lives down the street, this person lives right over there. Especially when you’re hometown is like Atlanta or Houston, a lot of rappers just stick together.

 

DJ Paul: The one thing about Three 6 Mafia and UGK is they been around so long and still doing good. UGK can come in like five years later with no video or promotion and still turn around and sell platinum. With some of the artist that you mentioned, like Big Daddy Kane, people don’t see them around any more, and some of the older East Coast artists aren’t making records. I think that’s why artists don’t go to them. But you see UGK all the time.

 

Now that you guys are nationally known, are you ready to take the brunt of criticism from the likes of Bill Cosby and Oprah?

DJ Paul: Man, we don’t pay attention to no negativity. As long as they cut the check, they can talk all they want. As long I keep getting paid, eat good and drink good, I am good.

 

You guys have worked with Project Pat for a long time and are currently working on a new album. He is another unrated artist that has never got his due. How do you plan on changing that?

Juicy J: How do we get Pat in the limelight? We constantly trying to promote him, put him on a lot of songs. He wrote a lot of songs on the new album. So he’s going to be around; he ain’t going nowhere. We’re coming out with my new album this year, and his new album is coming out. And we’re going to get him at the status that we are at right now. We just gotta keep working at it. It’s a hustle.

 

Three 6 Mafia’s membership has changed a bunch of times over the years, yet the core members have always stayed together. Why was it able to work between you guys and not the other former members of the group?

DJ Paul: We see eye to eye on everything. We got a lot of the same tastes. We like the same food, same women — sometimes we go with the same women! We pretty much like everything the same.

 

The club scene in the South is an important place to break records and keep up with your fan base. You had a hit back in the day called “Tear Da Club Up.” I couldn’t imagine what happens when you used to play a song like that in those small Southern clubs.

DJ Paul: “Tear Da Club Up” is what the South loves. That was always a big thing in Memphis. To tear the club up, man. We started out as deejays — before we was rappers we was deejays — so it was our job to cut the club up. But when we became rappers, it was the same mission.

 

You can tell; you guys have that deejay’s ear for catchy music.

Juicy J: Yeah, man. It’s them very catchy hooks that will get you a hit.

 

DJ Paul: That’s what Three 6 Mafia is all about: catchy hooks and hardcore beats. We like that shit as hard as we can get it — it’s in between rap and rock. Just crazy crank it up! Move you out yo’ seat.

 

Your track “Two-Way Freak” for me was ahead of its time. Now everybody uses text messages. How do you stop these freaks from abusing the phone?

Juicy J: Man, to get rid of a two-way freak, change yo’ number!

 

DJ Paul: Don’t ever text her back; just stop showing her attention, don’t text her “stop callin’ me, bitch” or “leave me da fuck alone!” Don’t do none of that. Jus stop responding, period. It might take a month, but she will eventually stop callin’ you.

 

Obviously things have changed drastically, but you have been doing your thing independently for a long time. How do you plan to keep your name bubbling in the mainstream?

DJ Paul: We have always handled our business on our own. Right now the business is just mo’ business that got to be handled. That ain’t no problem for us; we got a team and staff. We been doing this for years now, so it ain’t no problem.

 

You guys must have been offered a lot of different projects. Was there anything in particular that you refused to work on?

Juicy J: The only thing we turned down was some porn.

 

DJ Paul: That’s the only thing we have turned down so far. Would you do porn?

 

I can’t see myself doing porn, so probably not. I guess for the most part the offers have been up your alley?

Juicy J: Yeah, if they talking about the right money. We have turned down a bunch of shit where they weren’t talking the right money.

 

DJ Paul: Other than the porn shit, we turned plenty of shit that didn’t have the money right.

 

Juicy J: You got to have your money right!

 

You have the new show on MTV. During your time out in L.A. and away from Memphis, what did you miss the most?

DJ Paul: Food and family.

 

Juicy J, I remember you did a special with MTV where you drove around in your Bentley in the projects in Memphis. It seems like you guys have strong connection with home. Did you have any reservations about going out to Los Angeles?

Juicy J: Well, we still live in Memphis. We just came to L.A. to capitalize off the Oscar.

 

DJ Paul: Memphis will always be home, but we chasing money. If somebody told me there was treasure hidden in Yugoslavia, I am headed that way to get it. We tryin’ to go get the treasure man. Where it’s at? I don’t care how long I will have to be there, but I will return to Memphis with that treasure.

 

The new album, Last 2 Walk, is due on July 3. Do hardcore fans need to worry about Three 6 Mafia compromising their sound? And what can we expect from the album?

DJ Paul: Overall it is DJ Paul and Juicy J. We got Project Pat doing some writing and guest featuring on there. We got Game on the album, Lil Jon, Lil Keke, Paul Wall, Mike Jones, 8 Ball and MJG, the ladies of Crime Mob, some local heroes, Al Capone, Spanish Fly, Lil Whyte, and a feature from Akon.

 

Juicy J: The album is hot — our best album yet.

 

DJ Paul: People think that we moved to L.A. and the sound is going to be different, but the sound is the same. We are never going to disappoint our fans. The original Three 6 Mafia fans come first.

 

***

Band: http://www.triplesix.com/

Label: http://www.columbiarecords.com/

Audio: http://www.myspace.com/threesixmafia

The HHNLive.com Interview: MC Shan Part 2

June 6, 2007 at 9:37 pm | Posted in Found At Other Sites | Leave a comment

http://www.hhnlive.com/features/more/290

 Derek Phifer

HHNLIVE: Do you think that having a hot beat has become more important that having tight rhymes?

MC Shan: Well that’s what it looks like. If people get into the beats first and then get into your lyrics then that’s what it is. If you got a hot gospel song and everybody likes that beat, then all of the sudden they going to be like praise the lord like they did with the Kanye West record. You can put whatever you want into people’s heads; to dumb people anyway, but not me, because I’m not falling for the bullshit. I don’t want people to perceive me as being a hater. Some people can’t take my attitude. That’s why I don’t have much to say about what people are doing, because I ain’t studying their business. I don’t study what they’re doing, because I’m too busy studying what I’m doing. So they do what they do. When my album drops it’s going to be perceived how it’s perceived, but I guarantee you the album that I got now, it’s not going to be nothing like that “you love to hear the story,” not to say there is anything wrong with that, but in the same instance, it’s 2007.

And to tell you the truth, that remix (Where are they now) I would have liked to hear a lot of them cats sounding like they were doing something new you dig what I’m saying? When I hear an old school cat talking about remember me, remember me, it pisses me off. My response is shut the fuck up with that shit and do some new shit. Fuck what you did nigga. What the fuck are you doing now? That’s what counts. Niggas always say “Shan you a legend.” Man, fuck that legend shit. It’s what I’m about to do that you need to watch, fuck that old shit.

HHNLIVE: Yea it’s about staying relevant. When people start talking about you’re a legend, that’s almost like saying you’re a “has been.”

MC Shan: Yeah exactly and I’m not trying to get caught in that spot. All of that was good for publicity, niggas talking and speaking my name. Yeah all that’s good, but I’m going to use that for what it is and come with this new stuff. Because with the BEEF being out, that DVD, there’s a lot of young cats on the street that be dropping like “ain’t you that dude?” and that wouldn’t have happened 5 or 10 years ago when there wasn’t DVDs. I would of just been who the fuck? Even then, with publications like yours that’s over the internet and these other things, if it wasn’t for ya’ll then I wouldn’t be. Right now it’s 2007 and I’m stilling getting the interviews and you giving me life, so I love ya’ll for that. Ya’ll can get whatever.

HHNLIVE: So do you have a lead single off of your album?

MC Shan: No I don’t believe in that. You know why? Because basically a lot of times you pick it and somebody picks something else. So I’d rather just put it out and let the people pick and decide what should be what. Let them pick, because I got all kinds of stuff. And my main theory is fuck your house, your cars, the cash, the broads, the ice in the ring, Source Awards all that. Fuck that. That ain’t what it is. I ain’t impressed.

HHNLIVE: That being said, most people are pretty much rapping about the same things. Do you think that there’s a lack of variety going on as far as people’s rhymes?

MC Shan: Yea there’s a lack of variety. I thought you were going to ask me if I did it. Nope I don’t do that. But there’s a lack of variety. Come on man, I’m a real dude man. I ain’t impressed by what a nigga got. Fuck your chains and all that shit. If this was back in the days then you wouldn’t be rockin’ it like that, because a real nigga would have stuck your black ass up already. But they don’t take the chance to stick niggas up now days because half of that shit is fake. I remember a day back in the days where you couldn’t wear your shit. Yea go ahead and have your shit dangling down to your nuts and have that shit swinging through Brooklyn if you want.

HHNLIVE: Yea I can remember hearing about that when I was growing up out here.

MC Shan: I’m telling you nowadays it’s so different. If a nigga asked you “what time is it?” you knew it was on. Back in the day if you heard “yo shorty you got the time?” you knew you was about to have some drama. Niggas were going to rob you or whatever, but something was about to happen. You don’t get that now. Niggas is too ready to blast. Knuckle up motherfucker.

HHNLIVE: One thing I noticed is how the whole Bloods and Crips thing spilled over into New York. Then you’ve got dudes like Jim Jones saying that they’re Blood and they’re from New York. To me that’s a West Coast thing. Not that I have anything against it, but I think that’s something that should stay out there. It’s like people are trying too hard to be down with everybody else.

MC Shan: Yo let me tell you when I figured out about that gang shit. Back early, early in the day red and blue was my sneaker color. Back early in the day them niggas was no joke with that gang shit out in LA. Now it’s a different breed like everything, but back then them niggas was crazy. Fuck that, you wore red and blue you were really getting popped. And I used to wear red and blue sneakers walking through Compton. Fuck it because they knew I was Shan. You know, niggas gave me a pass. But that shit was serious. Like I said, that’s that LA shit. But niggas do what they do. Niggas had gangs in New York all the time, Tomahawks and all that back in the day, but niggas did it different. But in LA, them niggas would squeeze off on you for walking up the block, go do 2 months in county and say fuck it.

HHNLIVE: So how is that whole thing down there in Atlanta? Do they have gangs down there?

MC Shan: Well I don’t know I haven’t seen the shit. They got wild crimes down here. They be kidnapping motherfuckas and all that shit you see on COPS. It’s different shit down here. Niggas will get their heads blasted off. It’s different, it’s just different. Niggas is wild, buck wild. It’s different kind of shit. But I haven’t seen it. Maybe I’ve been hanging in the wrong shit or something. Who knows? But it’s good. I see some thug ass niggas, I’m walking and they walking and they’ll be like what up. It’s just a bunch of motherfuckas. They’re thinking “where the bitches at, where the hoes at?” They be geeked up. How you going to be worried about another nigga and you geeked up? It’s a happy drug; you don’t be seeing no fights. It’s too hot for all that bullshit. I’m loving down here, it’s just a change. It’s a whole different level down here. My kids can go out and do what they do. My son, he done graduated. Up in New York he would’ve never graduated. Nigga got a car, all that shit. He’s making payments on his own car. Out in New York kids ain’t on that shit. It’s a different level. Out in New York you see motherfuckas talking about “Oh I ain’t working at McDonald’s,” but down here all these little motherfuckas are working somewhere. These little niggas got jobs down here and they got a different mentality. And I’m so glad that I brought them down here at this stage in their lives, because they ain’t going to be shit like me, please. They’ll think it’s lay around and sleep all day if they follow after me, but they can’t look at me and think that’s what it is, cause that ain’t what it is.

HHNLIVE: Who are some of the people that you worked with on your album?

MC Shan: Nobody that you’d even know. I got beats from cats that’s trying to come up. I ain’t trying to pay a nigga $80,000 because he had the last hot record. Fuck that, my joint might be the next one where you’re fucking luck run out. I’ll be done gave you $80,000 for nothing.

HHNLIVE: So do you have your own label that your album is coming out on or are you signed to somebody?

MC Shan: Nah I got a distribution deal through IMG Universal. I got my own little label deal called Pioneer Disc. I got a whole Mixtape with me rapping over other niggas beats that I can’t put out because I ain’t trying to pay them sample clearances. Niggas ain’t gonna beat me in the head with that shit. Fuck that. Back in the day niggas wasn’t thinking about taking your shit, but that’s what it is now. That’s new hip hop.

HHNLIVE: Is it just going to be distributed over the internet?

MC Shan: Nah it’s going to be distributed in stores. It’s not going to be an internet album; well I’m going to have it on the internet, because I own the rights to all of my music so I can do whatever I want with it. I got other places to advertise it that I know of like my peeps in England and all that.

HHNLIVE: How is the hip hop scene over there? Are you just as big over there as you are back here?

MC Shan: Bigger. I did a show over there. I just came from Amsterdam. Niggas love old school hip hop. Over there the hip hop culture just embraces you better than it does over here. Over here they don’t know you past your last record in some cases, unless you’re very interesting. Over there you ain’t got to do shit. You can just be you and be a big nigga. I could be doing mad shows. Only thing stopping me is that I’ve got custody of my kids, so I can’t be out for months doing shows, or these niggas would never go to school. These motherfuckas down here lock you up if your kids don’t go to school.

HHNLIVE: What else are you working on other than your album?

MC Shan: I got my own radio station where I broadcast whatever the fuck I want 24hours a day 7 days a week. Right now I ain’t running it, because I’m tired of programming shit, but I’m putting it back up later tonight. I usually play some old school for them old school heads. I play old rap attack shows with Mr. Magic from back in the day. Niggas used to wake up at 2 o’clock in the morning and put their tape players on.

HHNLIVE: Is it only broadcasted down there?

MC Shan: No, it’s broadcasted all over the world. It’s on the internet. If you were to sign onto my Myspace page you should see it. I got my Myspace page www.myspace.com/shanfromqb rigged that if you got QuickTime or Real Player you’re going to go right to my radio station. It’s also on http://www.Macstreams.com in the hip hop section.

MC Shan: OH, OH I got a question that I’ve got to ask! What the fuck is up with these new cats with this throw your money away shit?

HHNLIVE: Oh, you’re talking about making rain?

MC Shan: Yea, what the fuck is that about? Please, somebody send me a fucking post. And then you call yourself a pimp. These bitches are the biggest pimps I know nowadays. Fuck that. Like I got my song “Bitch Know.” Know that I’m not this motherfucker with this motherfucking nigga with this make it rain shit bitch. I work too hard for my paper. I don’t give a fuck if it is free. Niggas got to explain that to me man.

HHNLIVE: I never got that either man. Fuck stuntin’ and putting on a performance making people think that you’ve got it to throw away.

MC Shan: Even if you’ve got it to throwaway, fuck out of here with that bullshit yo. Niggas done changed everything. Now bitches expect you. That’s why niggas can’t get any pussy unless spending some money, little faggots. The wife can get it all. I don’t give a fuck. My wife doesn’t understand. We’re about to get divorced, but I don’t treat her how I treat all these other bitches in the street. She just thinks I’m a bad motherfucker, but she just doesn’t understand.

HHNLIVE: One thing I’ve always wanted to know, and since you’re living down in the A, how are the strip clubs down there?

MC Shan: That’s where you get that make it rain bullshit yo. And niggas don’t understand that bitch going to take your money all night and then she going to come fuck me because I done slapped her on her ass and told her fuck you, I ain’t giving you shit. Now go make me some more money and smack her on her ass and send her back to them niggas. They going to spend their money all night and I’m going to wind up pounding that bitch out.

HHNLIVE: Have you ever been up in Magic City? That’s the joint that I’m always hearing about from people out of Atlanta.

MC Shan: Nah we be in Babes out in this motherfucka. We be in Babes and Marlene’s. We keep it local like a motherfucka. It jumps anyway. We go to Babes and Marlene’s because that’s the spots. Magic City, that’s that preppy shit. I’m a ghetto motherfucka. You catch me up in the gutter shit. Magic City, that’s where Jermaine and them niggas be making it rain. Well I can’t say him. I ain’t never seen him in there. Janet don’t get mad, I’ve never seen him in there. So don’t say I said it. That’s them Shop Boyz and them niggas. You hear them, party like a rock star?

HHNLIVE: Any shout outs you want to give before we wrap this up?

MC Shan: I just want to give shouts to all the people that supported me during these years. I want to thank you for giving me the shot for this interview because any kind of publicity is all good for me at this point in my life, you understand. So big shouts to you and everybody that reads the publication. And don’t forget to check out shanfromqb on Myspace and pioneer disc radio.

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